Category Archives: Isabella’s Bulletin

Wendell Berry: The Pleasures of Eating

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Please enjoy the words and love of a valued farmer, writer and environmental activist.

I give you, “The Pleasures Eating,” by Wendell Berry.

 

Many times, after I have finished a lecture on the decline of American farming and rural life, someone in the audience has asked, “What can city people do?”

“Eat responsibly,” I have usually answered. Of course, I have tried to explain what I mean by that, but afterwards I have invariably felt there was more to be said than I had been able to say. Now I would like to attempt a better explanation.

I begin with the proposition that eating is an agricultural act. Eating ends the annual drama of the food economy that begins with planting and birth. Most eaters, however, are no longer aware that this is true. They think of food as an agricultural product, perhaps, but they do not think of themselves as participants in agriculture. They think of themselves as “consumers.” If they think beyond that, they recognize that they are passive consumers. They buy what they want — or what they have been persuaded to want — within the limits of what they can get. They pay, mostly without protest, what they are charged. And they mostly ignore certain critical questions about the quality and the cost of what they are sold: How fresh is it? How pure or clean is it, how free of dangerous chemicals? How far was it transported, and what did transportation add to the cost? How much did manufacturing or packaging or advertising add to the cost? When the food product has been manufactured or “processed” or “precooked,” how has that affected its quality or price or nutritional value?

Most urban shoppers would tell you that food is produced on farms. But most of them do not know what farms, or what kinds of farms, or where the farms are, or what knowledge of skills are involved in farming. They apparently have little doubt that farms will continue to produce, but they do not know how or over what obstacles. For them, then, food is pretty much an abstract idea — something they do not know or imagine — until it appears on the grocery shelf or on the table.

The specialization of production induces specialization of consumption. Patrons of the entertainment industry, for example, entertain themselves less and less and have become more and more passively dependent on commercial suppliers. This is certainly true also of patrons of the food industry, who have tended more and more to be mere consumers — passive, uncritical, and dependent. Indeed, this sort of consumption may be said to be one of the chief goals of industrial production. The food industrialists have by now persuaded millions of consumers to prefer food that is already prepared. They will grow, deliver, and cook your food for you and (just like your mother) beg you to eat it. That they do not yet offer to insert it, prechewed, into our mouth is only because they have found no profitable way to do so. We may rest assured that they would be glad to find such a way. The ideal industrial food consumer would be strapped to a table with a tube running from the food factory directly into his or her stomach.

Perhaps I exaggerate, but not by much. The industrial eater is, in fact, one who does not know that eating is an agricultural act, who no longer knows or imagines the connections between eating and the land, and who is therefore necessarily passive and uncritical — in short, a victim. When food, in the minds of eaters, is no longer associated with farming and with the land, then the eaters are suffering a kind of cultural amnesia that is misleading and dangerous. The current version of the “dream home” of the future involves “effortless” shopping from a list of available goods on a television monitor and heating precooked food by remote control. Of course, this implies and depends on, a perfect ignorance of the history of the food that is consumed. It requires that the citizenry should give up their hereditary and sensible aversion to buying a pig in a poke. It wishes to make the selling of pigs in pokes an honorable and glamorous activity. The dreams in this dream home will perforce know nothing about the kind or quality of this food, or where it came from, or how it was produced and prepared, or what ingredients, additives, and residues it contains — unless, that is, the dreamer undertakes a close and constant study of the food industry, in which case he or she might as well wake up and play an active an responsible part in the economy of food.

There is, then, a politics of food that, like any politics, involves our freedom. We still (sometimes) remember that we cannot be free if our minds and voices are controlled by someone else. But we have neglected to understand that we cannot be free if our food and its sources are controlled by someone else. The condition of the passive consumer of food is not a democratic condition. One reason to eat responsibly is to live free.

But if there is a food politics, there are also a food esthetics and a food ethics, neither of which is dissociated from politics. Like industrial sex, industrial eating has become a degraded, poor, and paltry thing. Our kitchens and other eating places more and more resemble filling stations, as our homes more and more resemble motels. “Life is not very interesting,” we seem to have decided. “Let its satisfactions be minimal, perfunctory, and fast.” We hurry through our meals to go to work and hurry through our work in order to “recreate” ourselves in the evenings and on weekends and vacations. And then we hurry, with the greatest possible speed and noise and violence, through our recreation — for what? To eat the billionth hamburger at some fast-food joint hellbent on increasing the “quality” of our life? And all this is carried out in a remarkable obliviousness to the causes and effects, the possibilities and the purposes, of the life of the body in this world.

One will find this obliviousness represented in virgin purity in the advertisements of the food industry, in which food wears as much makeup as the actors. If one gained one’s whole knowledge of food from these advertisements (as some presumably do), one would not know that the various edibles were ever living creatures, or that they all come from the soil, or that they were produced by work. The passive American consumer, sitting down to a meal of pre-prepared or fast food, confronts a platter covered with inert, anonymous substances that have been processed, dyed, breaded, sauced, gravied, ground, pulped, strained, blended, prettified, and sanitized beyond resemblance to any part of any creature that ever lived. The products of nature and agriculture have been made, to all appearances, the products of industry. Both eater and eaten are thus in exile from biological reality. And the result is a kind of solitude, unprecedented in human experience, in which the eater may think of eating as, first, a purely commercial transaction between him and a supplier and then as a purely appetitive transaction between him and his food.

And this peculiar specialization of the act of eating is, again, of obvious benefit to the food industry, which has good reasons to obscure the connection between food and farming. It would not do for the consumer to know that the hamburger she is eating came from a steer who spent much of his life standing deep in his own excrement in a feedlot, helping to pollute the local streams, or that the calf that yielded the veal cutlet on her plate spent its life in a box in which it did not have room to turn around. And, though her sympathy for the slaw might be less tender, she should not be encouraged to meditate on the hygienic and biological implications of mile-square fields of cabbage, for vegetables grown in huge monocultures are dependent on toxic chemicals — just as animals in close confinements are dependent on antibiotics and other drugs.

The consumer, that is to say, must be kept from discovering that, in the food industry — as in any other industry — the overriding concerns are not quality and health, but volume and price. For decades now the entire industrial food economy, from the large farms and feedlots to the chains of supermarkets and fast-food restaurants has been obsessed with volume. It has relentlessly increased scale in order to increase volume in order (probably) to reduce costs. But as scale increases, diversity declines; as diversity declines, so does health; as health declines, the dependence on drugs and chemicals necessarily increases. As capital replaces labor, it does so by substituting machines, drugs, and chemicals for human workers and for the natural health and fertility of the soil. The food is produced by any means or any shortcuts that will increase profits. And the business of the cosmeticians of advertising is to persuade the consumer that food so produced is good, tasty, healthful, and a guarantee of marital fidelity and long life.

It is possible, then, to be liberated from the husbandry and wifery of the old household food economy. But one can be thus liberated only by entering a trap (unless one sees ignorance and helplessness as the signs of privilege, as many people apparently do). The trap is the ideal of industrialism: a walled city surrounded by valves that let merchandise in but no consciousness out. How does one escape this trap? Only voluntarily, the same way that one went in: by restoring one’s consciousness of what is involved in eating; by reclaiming responsibility for one’s own part in the food economy. One might begin with the illuminating principle of Sir Albert Howard’s , that we should understand “the whole problem of health in soil, plant, animal, and man as one great subject.” Eaters, that is, must understand that eating takes place inescapably in the world, that it is inescapably an agricultural act, and how we eat determines, to a considerable extent, how the world is used. This is a simple way of describing a relationship that is inexpressibly complex. To eat responsibly is to understand and enact, so far as we can, this complex relationship. What can one do? Here is a list, probably not definitive:

1. Participate in food production to the extent that you can. If you have a yard or even just a porch box or a pot in a sunny window, grow something to eat in it. Make a little compost of your kitchen scraps and use it for fertilizer. Only by growing some food for yourself can you become acquainted with the beautiful energy cycle that revolves from soil to seed to flower to fruit to food to offal to decay, and around again. You will be fully responsible for any food that you grow for yourself, and you will know all about it. You will appreciate it fully, having known it all its life.

2. Prepare your own food. This means reviving in your own mind and life the arts of kitchen and household. This should enable you to eat more cheaply, and it will give you a measure of “quality control”: you will have some reliable knowledge of what has been added to the food you eat.

3. Learn the origins of the food you buy, and buy the food that is produced closest to your home. The idea that every locality should be, as much as possible, the source of its own food makes several kinds of sense. The locally produced food supply is the most secure, freshest, and the easiest for local consumers to know about and to influence.

4. Whenever possible, deal directly with a local farmer, gardener, or orchardist. All the reasons listed for the previous suggestion apply here. In addition, by such dealing you eliminate the whole pack of merchants, transporters, processors, packagers, and advertisers who thrive at the expense of both producers and consumers.

5. Learn, in self-defense, as much as you can of the economy and technology of industrial food production. What is added to the food that is not food, and what do you pay for those additions?

6. Learn what is involved in the best farming and gardening.

7. Learn as much as you can, by direct observation and experience if possible, of the life histories of the food species.

The last suggestion seems particularly important to me. Many people are now as much estranged from the lives of domestic plants and animals (except for flowers and dogs and cats) as they are from the lives of the wild ones. This is regrettable, for these domestic creatures are in diverse ways attractive; there is such pleasure in knowing them. And farming, animal husbandry, horticulture, and gardening, at their best, are complex and comely arts; there is much pleasure in knowing them, too.

It follows that there is great displeasure in knowing about a food economy that degrades and abuses those arts and those plants and animals and the soil from which they come. For anyone who does know something of the modern history of food, eating away from home can be a chore. My own inclination is to eat seafood instead of red meat or poultry when I am traveling. Though I am by no means a vegetarian, I dislike the thought that some animal has been made miserable in order to feed me. If I am going to eat meat, I want it to be from an animal that has lived a pleasant, uncrowded life outdoors, on bountiful pasture, with good water nearby and trees for shade. And I am getting almost as fussy about food plants. I like to eat vegetables and fruits that I know have lived happily and healthily in good soil, not the products of the huge, bechemicaled factory-fields that I have seen, for example, in the Central Valley of California. The industrial farm is said to have been patterned on the factory production line. In practice, it looks more like a concentration camp.

The pleasure of eating should be an extensive pleasure, not that of the mere gourmet. People who know the garden in which their vegetables have grown and know that the garden is healthy and remember the beauty of the growing plants, perhaps in the dewy first light of morning when gardens are at their best. Such a memory involves itself with the food and is one of the pleasures of eating. The knowledge of the good health of the garden relieves and frees and comforts the eater. The same goes for eating meat. The thought of the good pasture and of the calf contentedly grazing flavors the steak. Some, I know, will think of it as bloodthirsty or worse to eat a fellow creature you have known all its life. On the contrary, I think it means that you eat with understanding and with gratitude. A significant part of the pleasure of eating is in one’s accurate consciousness of the lives and the world from which food comes. The pleasure of eating, then, may be the best available standard of our health. And this pleasure, I think, is pretty fully available to the urban consumer who will make the necessary effort.

I mentioned earlier the politics, esthetics, and ethics of food. But to speak of the pleasure of eating is to go beyond those categories. Eating with the fullest pleasure — pleasure, that is, that does not depend on ignorance — is perhaps the profoundest enactment of our connection with the world. In this pleasure we experience and celebrate our dependence and our gratitude, for we are living from mystery, from creatures we did not make and powers we cannot comprehend. When I think of the meaning of food, I always remember these lines by the poet William Carlos Williams, which seem to me merely honest:

There is nothing to eat,
seek it where you will,
but the body of the Lord.
The blessed plants
and the sea, yield it
to the imagination intact.

1989

“The Pleasures of Eating” from WHAT ARE PEOPLE FOR? by Wendell Berry. Copyright © 1990 by Wendell Berry.

A Soil’s Co-operative: A Guide to Building and Maintaining Healthy Soil

As Winter’s brisk air starts to warm and March winds blow Spring in, the time to sow our seeds begin.

Here at the Food Co-op we are feeling the affects of the new season as local greens and radishes start to decorate our produce cooler. Though we mostly offer food in it’s harvested form, we find it important to share knowledge pertaining it all things food, including how and where food is produced, with our valued Co-operators. With that said and in light of the season, today we wish to share with you, especially those beginner gardeners out there, a guide to building and maintaining healthy soils

Nourishing a Living Soil Community
Soil is a living ecosystem that is home to earthworms, insects, bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms. A balanced and healthy soil life produces soil nutrients, aids in controlling disease, improves soil structure, retains soil moisture and helps to reduce workload.
Should I get a soil test?
At first, soil tests can be confusing to read and may over complicate gardening. On first season beds, focus more on strengthening soil ecology.

-Soil testing is recommended after a bed’s first growing season or thereafter.

-Fertilizer needs are best determined by a soil test.

-Add fertilizer only if a nutrient is deficient and only add what is need-ed, not more.

-Support independent labs such as Logan Labs. A standard test is currently $25 dollars

Understanding Garden Happy Soil
A healthy balance of air (25%) water (25%), organic matter (3-4%) and minerals (47%) is needed for the ideal structural and functional environment for plant roots in gardens.
Soil Types
-Clay- Small particles, sticky when wet, holds water and nutrients well, poor drainage and low oxygen.
-*Loam- Dark color, soft and crumbles easily. Ideal soil type for gardening!
-Sand– Large particles, gritty, doesn’t hold water and nutrients well.
Soil pH
pH is a measure of acidity or alkalinity of a material. The pH scale ranges from 0-14, with 7 being neutral. A pH of 6.0 to 7.2 is optimal for the growth of most garden and landscape plants. How-ever, soil pH in the range of 7 to 8 is adequate for many plants, as what is commonly seen in Colorado.
The major problem created by alkaline (high pH) soils is the reduction of nutrient availability to plants.
Soil Compaction is a reduction in large pore space, which leads to…
-Decreased drainage
– Decreased oxygen levels
-Decreased rooting volume
-Limits water and nutrient uptake

Building and Maintaining Healthy Soil
Prevent Compaction
-Create walking pathways
– Stay off wet soil
– Apply organic amendment (compost)
– Avoid excess tilling, destroys soil structure
To Till or not to Till
-Tilling destroys soil community and soil structure.
– Not recommended unless starting a new bed, if necessary, only first few inches.
– Creates a bacteria dominate community, more ideal for weeds than vegetables.
The Magic of Mulch
-Maintains soil moisture/ cuts irrigation needs
-Creates and nourishes ecological environment by feeding microbes
-Blocks weeds
-Prevents erosion
Blanket the top of soil with a thick (3-4in) layer of leaves, grass clippings, wood chips, or straw.
Do not till in non-composted mulch materials.
Try using a “green manure” as a cover crop. Broad-cast seeds of clover, rye, barely, or wheat grass over your soil for nourishment and protection.

Adding Organic Matter
An organic amendment, such as compost, is an important energy source for the living soil community such as bacteria, fungi and earthworms.
Organic matter improves soil structure in both sandy and clayey soils. It improves water infiltration, drainage, air infiltration and improves rooting volume.
Be aware of over-amending!
When adding organic matter, in any given year, use no more than:
1” animal-based compost or manure
2” plant-based compost
Over amending can result in
-High salts
– Excessive nitrogen
– Low nitrogen
– Micro-nutrient imbalance
Though adding an organic amendment such as compost can work wonders on building soil health, too much of a good thing can have a negative impact.

Adding Minerals
Mineral rich solutions may be added to soil periodically to give plants an extra boost.
Some examples include…
– Liquid Kelp: Good source of micro-nutrients for immunity boost
– Compost Tea: Good source of nitrogen and living microbes
– Vermi-compost Tea: Enhances plant defenses against disease and improves crop yield

Don’t forget to stop by and pick up some organic seeds!

Happy growing Co-op friends!

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Not All Sugars are Created Equal

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Dietary carbohydrates, or sugars, play a critical role in our health because they provide us with our primary source of energy we need for proper bodily function. Though crucial to our health, most of us are aware that too much sugar can cause detrimental effects to our bodies, leading to obesity, diabetes and heart disease. What many of us may not be aware of is how different types of carbohydrates, or sugars, affect our body differently. The fact is, not all sugars are created equal.

Carbohydrates are classified into three basic groups: dietary fiber, simple sugars, and complex sugars. Dietary fiber is the indigestible part of plant foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes. Dietary fiber does not exist in animal products such as meat, eggs and milk. This type of carbohydrate is great for digestive health. It slows the digestion process which makes you feel full for longer, aids in blood sugar regulation, as well as increases bowl bulk due to its indigestible nature, promoting regularity. Whole grains, vegetables, nuts and legumes are the ideal sources for fiber intake verses supplement forms.

Complex sugars are named so because they are larger compounds that take our bodies longer to break down or digest. One of the most important health benefits complex sugars provide is that it aids in blood sugar control. By breaking down more slowly, sugar is released into our blood more gradually which helps maintain balanced and healthy vascular and central nervous systems. If sugar is released into our blood too quickly, or at too high of a volume, this can increase fat production as well as can cause sometimes irreversible damage to our bodies.

There are common misconceptions in our culture concerning simple carbohydrates. Simple sugars breakdown easily in our bodies because they are only either one or two sugar molecule compounds. One sugar molecule compounds are usually our refined sugars, which include sucrose (table sugar) and the infamous high-fructose corn syrup, which are both found in most processed foods. Two sugar compounds are found in fruits, root vegetables, honey, and milk. These types of sugars are considered advantageous over refined sugar. They are usually in combination with other vitamins, minerals and fiber, which aid its utilization and overall health benefits verses something like table sugar, because of the intense refining process, other nutrients that it could have possessed are removed.

Though evidence shows that there is not a direct link in disease due to a certain type of sugar, it is recognized that because as a nation we have almost doubled our sugar intake in general over the past 30 years, mostly due to an increase in our refined sugar intake, is why we are seeing increases of such diseases as obesity, diabetes and heart disease. These sugars are stripped of any sort of nutrient content and usually eaten in large quantities.  By decreasing our refined sugar intake and increasing our intake of fiber, complex sugars and non-refined simple sugars such as fruit and root vegetables, we are simultaneously increasing our overall intake of essential vitamins, minerals and other amazing health-protecting nutrients and thus making great contributions to our overall health.

The Fort Collins Food Co-op is an excellent place to help you eat a more nutrition and balanced diet.  We carry a full line of all organic fresh produce, are fully stocked with bulk whole grains, ancient grains, rice, nuts, seeds and legumes and amazing supply of over a hundred different dried herbs and spices.

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In the Defense of Beets

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It seems as though today the familiar velvety red and earthy beet has lost its glamor. Have many of us just had too many of these roots forced down our throats as children by our parents that the thought of them make us cringe? Perhaps we’ve allowed our fear of beets linger too long into our adults lives and it’s time to rediscover the bright and BEETiful nature of the beet.

Before the beet had its claim as a root vegetable, it was long consumed only for its leaves. It wasn’t until the late 1500s that it was starting to be cultivated for its root, and even then, it wasn’t for another couple centuries that it had positive global recognition. Northeastern Europe was the first area in the world to start cultivating the beet as a stable, seeing its value as being one of the only vegetables to grow through the winter.

Though an incredible value to grow throughout the winter, the beet also has outstandingly positive health effects. Beet root has long been used for its ability to stimulate the liver’s detoxification processes. The compound that gives beets their rich dark color called betacyanin, a pigment, has been thought to suppress the development of some types of cancer. Beet root has been shown to increase the level of antioxidants in our bodies, which also aid in preventing cancer. The beet root is one of the greatest sources of the amino acid glutamine, an essential nutrient to positive intestinal health. Beet roots also aids in the production of nitric oxide, a powerful molecule that increases blood flow and has heart protective properties. The leafy greens that grow on the surface are also chalk full of vitamins, minerals and fiber to keep our bodies happy and strong.

It’s no doubt that these familiar vegetables are good medicine, for our mothers always told us that, but do they stand up as worthy and palatable for consumption? Yes they do! Beet root is as versatile as our beloved potatoes. Roasted with herbs and spices; chopped and thrown into a vegetable soup or stew; shredded raw on salads and sandwiches. How about for a sweet treat in a smooth with bananas, berries and seeds?

At the Fort Collins Food Co-op we know the importance of beets. For much of the year, due to our longer cool vegetable growing season, we carry local, organic beets from our friends at Native Hill Farm. If you’re interested in trying something with a zest, try MM Local’s pickled beets, a Boulder company committed to quality pickled products using local and organic ingredients. Or support the local growing business of Turtle Mountain Tea by trying their vegan beet kim-chi.

In the words of Tom Robbins, “The beet is the ancient ancestor of the autumn moon, bearded, buried, all but fossilized; the dark green sails of the grounded moon-boat stitched with veins of primordial plasma; the kite string that once connected the moon to the Earth now a muddy whisker drilling desperately for rubies.” (Jitterbug Perfume)

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Home Storage Guide for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

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There are many reasons as to why properly and safely storing fresh fruits and vegetables is important. Not only does proper storage help to maintain the integrity of the product, but by doing so it increases the value of your dollar by decreasing the rate of spoilage, which also minimizes food-borne illnesses, and food waste.

Here at the Fort Collins Food Cooperative, we understand the challenge of keeping fruits and vegetables fresh for as long as possible. With society’s high standards for pristine looking produce as well as the high cost of organic goods, we’ve learned over the years how to keep products fresh and we’d like to share some of that knowledge with you!

Here are some basic guidelines you can follow to help maintain produce freshness longer and minimize food and dollar waste.

Produce storage location

  • Most vegetables do best if stored under refrigeration.

With the exception of lettuce, most fresh produce does better if washed just before consumption due to a natural covering that slows spoilage.

 

These fruits and vegetables do well on counter-tops:

  • apples, bananas, citrus, basil, cucumbers, peppers
  • pineapples, pomegranates, mangoes, eggplant, garlic, ginger
  • Place squash family, onions and potatoes in a cool, dry place.

 

Store fruits and vegetables separately

Fruits produce high levels of ethylene (a ripening agent) and can prematurely ripening and spoil surrounding vegetables.

Stone fruits (such as peaches and apricots), avocados, tomatoes, apples, bananas and melons will continue to ripen if left out on a counter-top.

Grapes, cherries and berries will deteriorate if left on a counter-top and should be refrigerated.

To slow the ripening process, place fruit in refrigerator and eat within 2-3 days.

To speed the ripening of fruit, place in a paper bag. Be sure to check every day to prevent over-ripening.

 

 

Refrigerate fresh produce that has been cut

Once fruits and vegetables have been cut, they should be used promptly or covered tightly and refrigerated for no more than two or three days. If cut produce is left at room temperature for longer than 2 hours it should be discarded.

 

Leafy greens

Leafy greens as romaine, green & red leaf lettuce and spinach will keep fresher if washed before storage.

  1. Wash with clean, cool running water.
  2. Discard wilted, discolored or blemished leaves.
  3. Carefully dry in salad spinner or on clean paper towels.
  4. Store in salad spinner or wrap lettuce loosely in clean paper towels and store in sealed plastic bag or container.
  5. Use within 1 week.

Happy Storing!

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Preserve Our Food, Preserve Our Planet

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As summer winds slowly die down and our sunlight begins to dwindle so does our beloved growing season here in Colorado. Though modern conveniences such as refrigerators, freezers, supermarkets and mass food distribution companies create a world of food accessibility and the illusion of a year-round growing season, there use to be a time when we didn’t have such luxuries and surviving through the winter relied heavily on food preservation and storage.

Much to our dismay, we are literally living in a time where we are seeing and feeling the effects of our consumption and watching our world’s finite resources, such as oil reserves, water-tables and land, decline and degrade, while simultaneously seeing costs increase.

Fortunately for us, the art of food preservation has not been lost. Preserving foods through methods such as canning, smoking, salting, drying and fermenting, not only provide us with delicious and nutritious foods with long shelf lives and no need for chemical-based food preservatives, but also helps us lower our overall carbon footprint. Preserving food at home lowers gas use of refrigeration storage and transportation of food from long distances, as well as lowers food waste and minimizes packaging waste that ends up in landfills.

How does one do such food preservation? One very simple and delicious method is by lacto-fermentation. This form of fermentation pickles vegetables in an oxygen-free environment in which “good” bacteria release lactic acid to produce the tangy flavor we desire. Fermented foods not only maintain high levels of nutrients already in vegetables but also increases the absorption of these nutrients and aids in the digestion of foods.

Please note that any vegetable you desire may be used in this process. At the Fort Collins Food Cooperative, we have over 30 locally sources fruits and vegetables available this time of year. We have local green beans and carrots from Native Hill Farm, garlic, cucumbers, and green peppers from Sunspot Urban Farm, cabbage and hot peppers from Ole Dern Farm, onions from Fossil Creek Farms and much, much more for your fermenting pleasure. We also carry over a hundred different spices in our bulk department, as well as a variety of iodine-free salts such as sea salt and Himalayan pink salt that are packed with essential minerals that keep our bodies strong.

Here is a recipe published by the web-resource, The Kitchn, written by Emily Han.

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Lacto-Fermented Mixed Pickles

Serves 8

3 tablespoons sea salt, pickling salt, or kosher salt (see Recipe Notes)
1 quart water (see Recipe Notes)
1 cup small cauliflower florets
1 cup carrot chunks or slices
1 cup red bell pepper chunks or slices
1 clove garlic, smashed and peeled
1 bay leaf
1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
1-2 grape leaves (optional, to help keep pickles crisp)

Combine salt and water in a measuring cup and stir until the salt is dissolved. (You can heat the water first to make the salt easier to dissolve, but it’s not necessary. Let it come to room temperature before making the pickles.)

Place the remaining ingredients in a very clean, large jar (a half-gallon mason jar works well). Pour the salt water over the vegetables, leaving at least 1 inch of headspace at the top of the jar. If necessary, add more water to cover the vegetables. (Optionally, place a small bowl or jar on top of the vegetables to hold them under the brine.)

Cover the jar tightly and let it stand at room temperature. About once a day, open the jar to taste the pickles and release gases produced during fermentation. If any mold or scum has formed on the top, simply skim it off. (If using a jar fitted with an airlock, you don’t need to “burp” it; just open occasionally to taste.)

When pickles taste to your liking, transfer the jar to the refrigerator. They will continue to ferment very slowly, but cold storage will largely halt fermentation. As a fermented food, these pickles will last for quite some time, at least a month or longer.

Recipe Notes:

  • Salt: Use salt that is free of iodine and/or anti-caking agents, which can inhibit fermentation.
  • Water: Chlorinated water can inhibit fermentation, so use spring, distilled, or filtered water if you can. It is also recommended to rinse the vegetables in un-chlorinated water rather than tap water.

Happy food preserving!

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Ain’t No Ordinary Onion

Facebook_Picture_OnionOf all the vegetables on this planet, the onion may be the most widely acclaimed of them all, being of precious dietary significance as far back as 5000 BC to being just as important to this day. Belonging to the allium family, a cousin to other household favorites such as garlic and shallots, it is estimated that over 9,000,000 acres of onions are grown annually, far exceeding any of its relatives.

Onions are denoted by their pungent flavor, dry papery outer skin, and their indistinguishable layered and bulbous body. Though a variety of wild and domesticated types of onions exist, yellow onions are the most commonly produced today, followed by red and white onions, each maintaining their own unique taste profile and culinary use.

While the vast and flavorful culinary uses for onions are undeniable, being used raw, sautéed, pickled or baked, they provide outstanding health benefits as well. Onions are high in vitamin C and an excellent source of dietary fiber and folic acid. They also contain a unique antioxidant compound called, quercetin. Quercetin has been shown to help eliminate free radicals that cause cell damage which can lead to cancer, as well as serve as protection from heart disease.

At the Fort Collins Food Co-op we carry yellow and red onions year-round, as well as do our best to provide local onions from neighboring farms such as Fossil Creek Farms and Native Hill Farm during the later summer months and into the autumn season. Don’t forget to try the infamous onions’ cousins too, such the mild and beautiful shallot or hard-neck purple garlic from Sunspot Urban Farm grown just a mile away.

Want to try something new? How about making your own caramelized onions to add a little gourmet to your home-cooked meals.

Prep time: 10 mins                            Cook time: 45 mins

Yields about 1 cup of caramelized onions

Ingredients:

2 medium onions (yellow, white or red based on preference)

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Instructions:

  1. Cut onions in half and slice thinly
  2. Melt butter in medium frying pan over low-medium heat until foaming
  3. Add onions evenly over pan and allow to cook slowly, stirring occasionally until golden brown. (about 45 minutes) If sticking or burning starts to occur, lower the heat.
  4. Remove from heat and allow to cool
  5. Enjoy on top of sandwiches, meats or pizza, topped on soups, or on its own!

The trick is to let them cook slowly, allowing the sugars to come out naturally.

Enjoy!

Sincerely, Isabella

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Changing of the Sales Tag guard, Monthly Sales, and Member-Owner savings

Can you believe it? It’s August already! August is indeed here and that means new monthly sales. Stop in and…

Save $5.00 on bulk cashews, only $7.99 per pound

Save $3.00 on Izzes’ soda, only $3.99 for a 4 pack

Save $9.20 on organic olive oil, only $10.99 for 25.4 fl oz container.

Save $10.26 on Seventh Generation laundry detergent, only $10.99 for a 2.95 Liter container and many more items throughout the entire store.

Not only did August bring new monthly sales, but it also introduced two new Co-op features.

We’ve replaced our red monthly sales tags with neon orange shelf tags. Keep your eyes peeled for the orange, traffic cone like, rectangle sales sign throughout the store and save big your favorite items.

Our other Co-op improvement features up to date Member-Owners receiving 10% off everyday, all day, on every full priced item, throughout the entire store. This offer does exclude monthly sales and already discounted items. We do ask our wonderful Co-op Member-Owners to be up to date on their monthly Member-Owner dues beginning  in September 2015.

Everyone is welcome to shop at the Food Co-op and Member-Ownership is always encouraged. It only takes a few minutes to join the Food Co-op and the investment in your community is priceless.

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The Curious Kohlrabi

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With a name as strange and unfamiliar as its appearance, this surprisingly light and versatile vegetable has its roots in the cruciferous vegetable family, the same family as some of our household favorites such as broccoli and cabbage. Kohlrabi is a large bulbous steam vegetable with a mild and delicate mustard flavor and crisp texture similar to that of an apple.

Kohlrabi has made most of its claim to fame in Germany and other Eastern European cuisine but has a long culinary history in Asia as well. Here in America, this mysterious and mostly unknown vegetable has yet to make its mark on our dinner plates unlike a lot of its cousins such as kale and cauliflower.

Though unfamiliar, kohlrabi has many known benefits to make it a worthy component to anyone’s diet. Known as a cool season crop, this fast growing vegetable can tolerate light frosts in the garden as well as can withstand temperatures up to 85 degrees making it suitable for most temperaments and ready for harvest in the spring and fall. Not only is kohlrabi a great addition to the garden, it also supplies amazing nutritional and health benefits packed with essential vitamins and minerals. Just like other cruciferous vegetables, kohlrabi is high in dietary fiber which aides in digestive health and helps regulate blood sugar. It is also high in minerals such as potassium, copper and iron that are essential for proper nerve and muscle function, as well as contains anti-oxidant components that are protective against cancer.

At first this vegetable may look intimidating and hard to use, but when it’s outer covering is peeled off, it can be used in most cooking methods, as well as eaten raw. It can be baked, sautéed, broiled, used in stuffing, roasted and even grilled on a kabob. The leaves can be eaten too, used similarly to or in place of kale.

Here at the Fort Collins Food Co-op we offer green and purple kohlrabi varieties sold by the pound from some of our favorite local farms, such as Native Hill Farm.

3 simple ways to enjoy kohlrabi:

  1. Eat raw with either shredded in a salad or alone chopped in big chucks lightly sprinkled in salt.
  1. Throw into a chunky vegetable soup, or pureed with potatoes, spices and cream.
  1. Enjoy as a hash patter or as a fitter shredded and mixed with an egg and flour and fried in a pan.

 

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