Monthly Archives: October 2015

November Sales, Turkey Time, and Board of Directors Applications

Sales_Turkeys_BODNovember Sales begin Monday November 1st, but here’s a little sneak peak of your favorite sales items happening in every department:

Once again, the Bulk department is offering a bounty of savings! Save a $1.00 off peanut butter pretzels and Fair Trade, Vegan Dark Chocolate Chips.

Also, save $2.00 dollars off whole raw cashews and roasted salted pistachios.

 Not to be out done by Bulk’s bounty, the Grocery department is offering quiet the selection of savings, especially when it comes to holiday baking. Save $2.40 on parchment paper and don’t forget to use spectrum naturals extra virgin olive oil now $7 dollars off the regular price.

The Refrigerated section is offering limited edition Silk Almond Nog with a dash of Pumpkin Spice; a tasty holiday treat and a $1.00 off the retail price.

Amy’s Burritos are also on sale in the Frozen food department in November. They can indeed be a wonderful day or nighttime snack, 50 cents off!

Lets not forget about the full color spectrum of Dr. Bronners 32 oz castile soap! It’s $4 dollars off its regular price in the Body Care section for the entire month of November!

For more sales offers visit our website or stop by the Food Co-op for more store wide saving offers.

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Gobble! Gobble! Its that turkey time of year again at the Food Co-op!

Pre-order your Thanksgiving turkey now with your cashier or over the phone [970]484-7448 .   All of the turkeys offered have never been caged or given hormones or antibiotics.

We offer a wide variety of size selections ranging from 8-12, 12-16, 16-20, and 20-24/per pound. Only $3.35/per pound!

All turkeys are delivered Monday, November 23rd and pre-ordering is based on a first come, first serve basis. There is a limited supply so order yours now!

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Only a few days remain for Member-Owners to turn in their Board of Directors applications. There are 3 seats available in this upcoming B.O.D election. Applications are due this coming Saturday and voting will begin on November 4th through November 24th. Applications are at the front register of the Food Co-op or on our website.

Your completed application, your picture, and your ballot statement will all be posted in the store by the ballot box during the voting period.

Three B.O.D positions are available and a single B.O.D term is three years.

2015 Election Timeline:

  • November 4 – Voting begins at 8:30am
  • November 24   –   Voting closes by 8pm
  • November 25  – Votes counted
  • November 27  –  Election results announced
  • January 1, 2016  – Term begins

For more information regarding the Food Co-op Board of Directors and the upcoming election please visit the Fort Collins Food Cooperative website.

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Home Storage Guide for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

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There are many reasons as to why properly and safely storing fresh fruits and vegetables is important. Not only does proper storage help to maintain the integrity of the product, but by doing so it increases the value of your dollar by decreasing the rate of spoilage, which also minimizes food-borne illnesses, and food waste.

Here at the Fort Collins Food Cooperative, we understand the challenge of keeping fruits and vegetables fresh for as long as possible. With society’s high standards for pristine looking produce as well as the high cost of organic goods, we’ve learned over the years how to keep products fresh and we’d like to share some of that knowledge with you!

Here are some basic guidelines you can follow to help maintain produce freshness longer and minimize food and dollar waste.

Produce storage location

  • Most vegetables do best if stored under refrigeration.

With the exception of lettuce, most fresh produce does better if washed just before consumption due to a natural covering that slows spoilage.

 

These fruits and vegetables do well on counter-tops:

  • apples, bananas, citrus, basil, cucumbers, peppers
  • pineapples, pomegranates, mangoes, eggplant, garlic, ginger
  • Place squash family, onions and potatoes in a cool, dry place.

 

Store fruits and vegetables separately

Fruits produce high levels of ethylene (a ripening agent) and can prematurely ripening and spoil surrounding vegetables.

Stone fruits (such as peaches and apricots), avocados, tomatoes, apples, bananas and melons will continue to ripen if left out on a counter-top.

Grapes, cherries and berries will deteriorate if left on a counter-top and should be refrigerated.

To slow the ripening process, place fruit in refrigerator and eat within 2-3 days.

To speed the ripening of fruit, place in a paper bag. Be sure to check every day to prevent over-ripening.

 

 

Refrigerate fresh produce that has been cut

Once fruits and vegetables have been cut, they should be used promptly or covered tightly and refrigerated for no more than two or three days. If cut produce is left at room temperature for longer than 2 hours it should be discarded.

 

Leafy greens

Leafy greens as romaine, green & red leaf lettuce and spinach will keep fresher if washed before storage.

  1. Wash with clean, cool running water.
  2. Discard wilted, discolored or blemished leaves.
  3. Carefully dry in salad spinner or on clean paper towels.
  4. Store in salad spinner or wrap lettuce loosely in clean paper towels and store in sealed plastic bag or container.
  5. Use within 1 week.

Happy Storing!

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The Bulkier The Better

Jordan's_blog_PictureHot–air balloons, birthday cakes, and Big Bird. What do these three have in common?

Not only do they ignite the interest of children and adults alike, but they also share this simple trait: they are all bulky.

Five years ago, the Bulk is Green Council, or fittingly referred to as BIG, initiated the National Bulk Week, in celebration, praise, and raised awareness of the sheer diverse amount of both staple (grains, beans, salts, sugars, flours) and specialty (coffee, granola, nuts, trail mixes) available for purchase in macro and micro quantities.

Well dear friendly folks & folky friends, we at the Fort Collins Food Co­–op are currently in the belly of the Fifth Annual Bulk Week!

We are joining 1,400 other participating stores around this supersized nation—one that paradoxically seems infatuated with people, places, and things (also called nouns) being ever–so sleek and skinnier still.

Fat (pronounced with a ‘ph’) fact: Portland State University’s Food Industry Leadership Center compiled a 2011 study, finding that people save an average of 89% when purchasing the same foods in bulk, compared to their (over)packaged counterparts.

Rather than preach at/to you about the bulk benefits that burst at the seams, or try to singularly address commonly shared questions, I choose instead to highlight some of our featured (and my favorite) bulk items you may be currently getting (extra) prepackaged:

Lest we forget, it is with sincere appreciation that I give a very honorable mention to the produce(rs) and what I consider to be the freshershest bulk section that considerably provides us with fine fruits, roots, lively leafy greens, prime peppers, potatoes, divine tomatoes, squash and rare heirloom pumpkins throughout the abundant growing season here in Colorado.

Yes, bulk is beautiful, and we’re bringing it back to the max (ever wonder why we keep it all in the back of the store?)

For those of you who skim articles, here’s the skinny: Help us make a difference in the world by supporting our co–op as generously as you can, by bringing your own bags/containers, and by continuing to create quality conversations with one another, i.e. share a recipe, suggest an herbal tea, select a different spice.

You just might find you not only get what you need, but also your savings will bulk up!

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Protecting your Thyroid Gland

Blog_PictureYour thyroid gland regulates the metabolism of every cell in your body. Since the thyroid affects every organ in the body, it can cause you to gain weight, lose weight, and have dry skin, to be anxious or depressed. It can cause heart palpitations, constipation or diarrhea.

I would like to share a few ideas that you may like to try to protect your thyroid gland. First, your thyroid gland requires a small amount of iodine in order to make thyroid hormone. It doesn’t require a lot, because the body recycles it. Some foods that contain significant amounts of iodine include asparagus, seafood, garlic, kelp, lobster, salmon, sea salt, seaweed, spinach, and sunflower seeds. Iodized salt contains a small amount of iodine, but I recommend the use of Himalayan salt or Celtic sea [both can be found at the Fort Collins Food Cooperative] salt because of their broader mineral content.

Your thyroid needs to be protected from fluoride, chloride and bromide, since they act similarly to iodine and may displace it in the thyroid. Avoid drinking fluoridated water as it has little, if any, strengthening effect on the teeth. A person takes in more chlorine from showering in chlorinated water than they do from swimming in a chlorinated pool, so you may want to install a chlorine filter on your showerhead.  Bromine is often found in hot tubs, so you may want to run a fan to blow the fumes away from you while hot tubbing. Some commercial flours and Mountain Dew contain bromine, so avoid them.

Since many thyroid conditions have an auto-immune component, it is important to keep your immune system healthy by avoiding inflammatory foods and by promptly addressing infections.

By Joan D Waters, ND Practical Health Solutions, LLC

Providing you with the tools to live healthfully in this increasingly challenging world.PractticalHealthSolutions