Monthly Archives: July 2015

The Curious Kohlrabi

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With a name as strange and unfamiliar as its appearance, this surprisingly light and versatile vegetable has its roots in the cruciferous vegetable family, the same family as some of our household favorites such as broccoli and cabbage. Kohlrabi is a large bulbous steam vegetable with a mild and delicate mustard flavor and crisp texture similar to that of an apple.

Kohlrabi has made most of its claim to fame in Germany and other Eastern European cuisine but has a long culinary history in Asia as well. Here in America, this mysterious and mostly unknown vegetable has yet to make its mark on our dinner plates unlike a lot of its cousins such as kale and cauliflower.

Though unfamiliar, kohlrabi has many known benefits to make it a worthy component to anyone’s diet. Known as a cool season crop, this fast growing vegetable can tolerate light frosts in the garden as well as can withstand temperatures up to 85 degrees making it suitable for most temperaments and ready for harvest in the spring and fall. Not only is kohlrabi a great addition to the garden, it also supplies amazing nutritional and health benefits packed with essential vitamins and minerals. Just like other cruciferous vegetables, kohlrabi is high in dietary fiber which aides in digestive health and helps regulate blood sugar. It is also high in minerals such as potassium, copper and iron that are essential for proper nerve and muscle function, as well as contains anti-oxidant components that are protective against cancer.

At first this vegetable may look intimidating and hard to use, but when it’s outer covering is peeled off, it can be used in most cooking methods, as well as eaten raw. It can be baked, sautéed, broiled, used in stuffing, roasted and even grilled on a kabob. The leaves can be eaten too, used similarly to or in place of kale.

Here at the Fort Collins Food Co-op we offer green and purple kohlrabi varieties sold by the pound from some of our favorite local farms, such as Native Hill Farm.

3 simple ways to enjoy kohlrabi:

  1. Eat raw with either shredded in a salad or alone chopped in big chucks lightly sprinkled in salt.
  1. Throw into a chunky vegetable soup, or pureed with potatoes, spices and cream.
  1. Enjoy as a hash patter or as a fitter shredded and mixed with an egg and flour and fried in a pan.

 

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Are you a Member-Owner? Yes, I am!

Whether you are fully financially invested in the Food Co–op, currently well on your way with quarterly payments, or simply a casual convenience shopper, chances are you’ve been asked at the register: “Are you a member–owner of the Food Co-op?”

No matter the answer, it’s *always* okay, because anyone and everyone is welcome to shop at the Food Co-op.

I’ve contemplated, this seemingly innocent question, and upon my reflection I have come to some conclusions.

The common replies I hear from nonmember–owners range from the straightforward “No, I’m not” to the guilt–tinged “No…but I should be” to the indecisive optimist “Not yet…I’m thinking about it”.

Still, I’ve noticed Member–Owners respond with positive affirmation: “Yes, I am.”

I may as well be asking: Are you a supporter a locally engaged business? Who possess global principles that emphasize independent, voluntary, democratic participation? And are you a concerned, educated, trained, and well-informed community leader?

I could very well be asking: Are you a citizen of this earth, who is on some subtle level, aware that each one of us play an important role and possess a higher responsibility to a healthy mind and health conscious society?

I would like to be asking: Are you doing your personal best each day and night to become the person you know exists in your heart and at your very core?

As marvelous human beings, not merely human doings, we must respond to the wake–up calls of negativity with persistent positivity. Even if and especially when that response involves a repetitive question: Are you a Member–Owner of the Food Co-op?

Yes, I am!


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Jordan is a Food Co–op Chronicle staff writer who sometimes simply offers hearty slices of New York–style sass, including this fine–print follow–up to the asterisks above: *forgot your wallet? fuhgeddabowdit!*

Maintaining Gut Health while Traveling Abroad

When traveling abroad, your immune system encounters exotic pathogens for which it is unprepared, increasing your risk of infection.

When our immune system recognizes a new pathogen (potentially harmful microorganism), it makes memory B cells so that the next time we encounter that organism, the body rapidly makes antibodies to it. As we grow, we develop memory B cells for all the pathogens that we have been exposed to, allowing our body to react rapidly to them, often without us knowing it is occurring. When abroad, we don’t have this protection because we are encountering some pathogens for the first time. For this reason, we need to be more careful about what we eat and drink and the water we swim in while we are abroad.

Stomach acid kills most pathogens that we ingest. If you are taking a proton pump inhibitor or other acid-blocking agent, you are more susceptible to infection. You may want to consider suggesting to your doctor that you begin taking it between meals instead of before you eat. Taking an apple cider vinegar tablet (available at Fort Collins Food Coop) before each meal has been shown to stimulate the production of stomach acid, which, in turn, stimulates the secretion of digestive enzymes. The body needs to be in a relaxed state to enable the stomach to produce enough acid to kill pathogens and digest food. Prayer, deep breathing or meditation may help you relax.

Taking a probiotic (available at Fort Collins Food Coop) will help prevent colonization of a pathogen in the intestines. The probiotic bacteria will fill the spaces vacated by bacteria that die, crowding out pathogens, preventing their attachment, and allowing them to pass right through you.

By Joan D Waters, naturopathic doctor
www.practicalhealthsolutions.com

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There’s a New Sale in Town

Greetings Food Cooperative shoppers,

There’s a new sale in town this month, so mosey on down to the Food Co-op for savings on your favorite products, from your favorite Food Cooperative.

Bulk is blowing up with savings on large cashew pieces only $7.99/lb, Millet is just .99 cents/lb, and Members – Owners save on freshly ground, organic peanut butter only $3.99/lb.

Grocery sales are heating up with Garden of Eatin’ Red Hot Blues corn chips on sale for 2/$5, Blue Sky Cherry Vanilla Crème soda is on sale for $3.49 a savings of $2.80, and Organic Spectrum Extra Virgin Olive Oil is on sale for just $10.99 a savings of $11.00.

Frozen is staying cool with sea salt caramel and mediterranean mint, Talenti Gelato ice cream, being on sale for just $4.80, a savings of $1.60.

Click the image below for additional sales information on Body Care, Supplements, and Local products on sale. For even more additional sales information on all sales products, come on down to the Food Co-opMonthlyHotDeals_BannerJuly_sales